Submerged Cities & Landscapes

Submerged Cities & Landscapes

I have heard it said that some people do not believe in the existence of cities beneath the sea. What a pity not to believe in facts which are as strange as any legend. - Nic Flemming

 

Maritime archaeology, so often thought of in relation to shipwrecks and ports, is here seen in the context of landscape. From the most recent Holocene transgression, drowning aspects of our earliest settlements, all the way back through the large-scale changes of the Pleistocene ice ages and our hominin ancestors, submerged landscapes encapsulate a broad and dynamic archaeological discipline. Despite emerging as such almost a century ago (Clarke etc), the systematic engagement with these submerged landscapes has developed both slowly and differentially: interest for the Holocene aspects has been far quicker to develop than for that associated with the more remote Pleistocene past. In both cases, however, these landscapes are crucial for our interpretation of a range of issues such as early hominin migrations, human interaction with coastal and marine resources, and, increasingly, past adaptations to climate change as manifested by sea level and environmental fluctuations.

With the recent proliferation of submerged research from archaeological, geophysical and geoarchaeological angles, this page will bring you information about new and upcoming research.

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